October 2011 Archives

Lesson #40 - Unit #6 Objective Exam

Not a whole lot to say here... Thank you for a great quarter.

We'll take the Unit #6 Objective Exam. There are 60 multiple choice questions.

Your Unit #6 Essay should be printed out and turned in to me before you leave school.

Remember to turn in any additional assignments/ make any additional blog postings as well...


Extra credit film reviews should be posted by the end of Sunday in order to receive credit. 


Homework for next session - sometime in January 2012!

Come back Quarter 3, and we'll start from there...

Lesson #39 - Unit #6 Identifications/DBQ Exam

If you plan to word-process, you can download a copy of the Unit #6 Identifications exam.


REMINDER: You should be finished with the identifications before you leave class. I'd recommend you also start/complete your DBQs as time permits.

Unit #6 Identifications: You'll receive (or download) a template and write on your choice of 5 of the 8 identifications that appear. You may have 10 words of "notes" for each of the 15 possible identifications to the exam. You will need to turn in these notes, and I reserve the right to count symbols, acronyms, etc. as one or more words. Each of the five identifications is worth 5 points.

A good identification is typically in the range of 4 to 6 sentences in length. (You do need to write in complete sentences.) You should demonstrate both an understanding of just who / what the ID "is" and place it in the appropriate historical context. In addition, you need to explain the significance of the ID. In other words, answer the "So what?" question.


HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Friday, October 28th

You have the Unit #6 Objective Exam tomorrow. There are 60 multiple choice questions.

Your Unit #6 Essay should be printed out and turned in to me before you leave school on Friday.

Remember to turn in any additional assignments/ make any additional blog postings as well...


Extra credit film reviews should be posted by the end of Sunday in order to receive credit.

Lesson #38 - Unit #6 "Two-Minute" Review

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Don't forget to make sure you have posted your "Blog-a-thon" and also turn in both your China "Learn By Doing" and any other assignments before we wrap things up this week.

We'll spend today doing our review activity. We'll get started right away so that we can get through this all. You can post comments on this blog entry if you'd like to share anything with others.

Here's a copy of the Unit #6 Review and Study Guide. (You received a paper copy on the first day of the unit. This is the same as that one.)

Here's a copy of the Unit #6 "Two-Minute" Review template that I use to take notes on the projector.


UNIT 6: Industrialism and the Race for Empire (1790 - 1914) 

Chapter 25 - The Industrial Revolution (1700 - 1900) 
1 The Beginnings of Industrialization 
2 Industrialization 
3 Industrialization Spreads 
4 Reforming the Industrial World 

Chapter 26 - An Age of Democracy and Progress (1815 - 1914) 
1 Democratic Reform and Activism 
2 Self-Rule for British Colonies 
3 War and Expansionism in the United States 
4 Nineteenth-Century Progress 

Chapter 27- The Age of Imperialism (1850 -1914) 
1 The Scramble for Africa 
2 Imperialism 
3 Europeans Claim Muslim Lands 
4 British Imperialism in India 
5 Imperialism in Southeast Asia 

Chapter 28 - Transformations Around the Globe (1800 - 1914) 
1 China Resists Outside Influence 
2 Modernization in Japan 
3 U.S. Economic Imperialism 
4 Turmoil and Change in Mexico 


HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Thursday, October 27th

We'll have the Unit #6 Exam on Thursday and Friday. Thursday will be the Identifications/DBQs, and you are allowed to bring ten words of notes for each potential ID. On Friday, we'll have the Objective Exam. That will consist of 60 multiple choice questions. Your essay should be printed out and turned in no later than at your arrival to the exam on Friday. 

Lesson #37 - The Mexican Revolution

This is our last "regular" lesson of the quarter, and we'll turn our attention to the Mexican Revolution of the early 20th century. Wednesday will be our Unit #6 "Two-Minute Reviews," and we'll wrap up with the Unit #6 Exam on Thursday and Friday. (Thursday is the Identification/DBQ Exam, and the Objective Exam is Friday. You need to turn in the Unit #6 Essay Exam no later than your arrival for class on Friday.) More information below on this.

The Mexican Revolution: As you probably picked up from the reading for today, the events in Mexico leading up to, and including, the revolution are very complex. We'll try to make sense of this in two different ways after we take a quick look at some major events.

Timeline - The Road to Revolution:

1821 - Mexico gains independence from Spain
1833 - 1855 - Santa Anna serves four times as president
1835 - Texas settlers revolt against Mexico
1845 - United States annexes Texas
1848 - Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ends Mexican-American War
1861 - Benito Juarez becomes president following civil war
1862 - France sends army, holds power for five years
1876 - 1911 - Porfirio Diaz rules Mexico
1910 - Francisco Madero calls for revolution, Diaz steps down
1911 - Madero becomes president
1913 - General Huerta takes power, Madero assassinated
1915 - Huerta overthrown, Carranza takes power
1917 - Mexico adopts constitution
1919 - Carranza turns on revolutionary allies, ends war

"Campaigning for Power": This seems particularly appropriate as we approach another presidential election year here in 2012. The premise is this: It is early in 1910, and the country of Mexico is planning an election for President of Mexico. You are on the campaign staff for one of the figures below. You need to come up with a single sheet "poster" for your candidate. Obviously, it should make clear something about what he stands for, promises to do, or whatever seems appropriate. You can decide whether to use color, pictures, graphics, etc., but it should be in a form you can show on the projector and/or email to me.

  • Benito Juarez (He's dead by then, but he deserves a poster...)
  • Porfiro Diaz
  • Francisco Madero
  • Pancho Villa
  • Emiliano Zapata
  • Victoriano Huerta
  • Venustiano Carranza

Artists Look at the Revolution: We'll try something a little different here with these five artists. All of them were influenced by the events of the Mexican Revolution in one way or another. Your job is to find at least TWO works by "your" artist that you feel show us something meaningful about Mexico from the time that we are studying. Make sure you can readily access these at the projector. You decide what background information we need, etc.

In some cases, I've also listed a particular work by the artist. You don't NEED to make that one of your choices, but they were identified elsewhere as being influenced by the Mexican Revolution.

  • Jose Guadalupe Posada - Catrina Calavera
  • Diego Rivera
  • Frida Kahlo
  • David Alfaro Siqueiros - Echo of a Scream
  • Jose Clemente Orozco - Father Miguel Hidalgo

Homework for tomorrow - Wednesday, October 26th:     

Your China "Create-an-Assignment" is now due.

Your Unit #6 "Two-Minute Review" will be due on Wednesday.

The Unit #6 Exam will take place on Thursday and Friday. On Thursday, you should complete the Identifications/DBQ portion of the exam. On Friday, you must complete the Objective Exam. Your Unit #6 Essay is due (printed out and double-spaced) no later than your arrival to class on Friday. 

Lesson #36 - The United States in Latin America

We'll have our final "regular" lessons today and tomorrow. Wednesday will be our Unit #6 "Two-Minute Reviews," and we'll wrap up with the Unit #6 Exam on Thursday and Friday. (Thursday is the Identification/DBQ Exam, and the Objective Exam is Friday. You need to turn in the Unit #6 Essay Exam no later than your arrival to class on Friday.)

A reminder that you should have posted your "Blog-a-thon" entry on the correct lesson.

Unit #6 "Two-Minute Review": Our review activity will take place on Wednesday.

The United States in Latin America: Even a casual reading of the assignment for today should make it clear that the United States has a long record of intervention in Latin America. I have not checked all examples on this site for accuracy or anything, but here is a long list of United States interventions in Latin America.

We'll have you look at some editorial cartoons on US foreign policy towards Latin America here as well.

Specifics of which you should be aware:

Discussion: United States Foreign Policy - Then and Now
We've talked, directly and indirectly, about a number of events in the history of American foreign policy over the last couple of weeks. Some of them were quite noble and well-intentioned, others were less so. Here's your chance to talk about events from both then and now.

First, let's focus on "then."
  • Was the United States being imperialistic when it issued the Monroe Doctrine? Why or why not?
  • Was "manifest destiny" justified? Why or why not?
  • Did the US act appropriately in the Mexican-American War? Why or why not?
  • Were US actions in Spanish-American War justified? Why or why not?
  • Were US actions in securing land for and building the Panama Canal appropriate? Why or why not?
  • Was the Roosevelt Corollary justified? Why or why not?
Second, let's turn to the "now."
  • What "limits" should there be on United States' foreign policy? What tools, tactics and strategies are appropriate? Which should not be considered?
  • What external factors should influence our foreign policy decisions? Why?
  • Are we imperialistic? Should we be?
  • What sort of relationship should we pursue with the nations of Latin America?
  • Is it time to end our economic embargo on Cuba?
  • Should we grant Puerto Rico independence? Statehood?
  • Were we correct to turn the Panama Canal Zone over to Panama's control in 1977?

Homework for tomorrow - Tuesday, October 25th:     

Finish your reading for the quarter in Chapter 28 with Section 4, "Turmoil and Change in Mexico." (pp. 822 - 827) The quiz format will be true/false.

Your China "Choose Your Assignments" are due tomorrow.

Your Unit #6 "Two-Minute Review" will be due on Wednesday.

The Unit #6 Exam will take place on Thursday and Friday. On Thursday, you must complete the Identifications portion of the exam. On Friday, you must complete the Objective Exam. Your Unit #6 Essay is due (printed out and double-spaced) no later than your arrival to class on Friday. More information on the exam is available on the entry immediately preceding this one on the blog.

Unit #6 Exam - Identifications and Essay Questions

Unit #6 Identifications: On Thursday, October 27th, you will write on your choice of 5 of the 8 identifications that appear on the Unit #6 exam chosen from the list below. You may bring 10 words of "notes" for each of the 15 possible identifications to the exam.  (Printed out, not on your computer.) You will need to turn in these notes, and I reserve the right to count symbols, acronyms, etc. as one or more words. Each of the five identifications is worth 5 points.  

A good identification is typically in the range of 4 to 6 sentences in length.  (You do need to write in complete sentences.)  You should demonstrate both an understanding of just who / what the ID "is" and place it in the appropriate historical context.  In addition, you need to explain the significance of the ID.  In other words, answer the "So what?" question.

Adam Smith
Karl Marx
Dreyfus Affair
manifest destiny
Emancipation Proclamation
Henry Ford
Thomas Edison 
Social Darwinism
Berlin Conference
Crimean War
Sepoy Mutiny
Opium War
Taiping Rebellion
Meiji era
Monroe Doctrine


Unit #6 Essay Exam - Questions and Format - You'll  write an essay as part of the Unit #6 Exam. This essay will be turned in by the beginning of class on Friday, October 28th.  (You will have the class period on Thursday AFTER you finish the identifications, but that is the only class time that will be allotted.) Below you can find both the questions from which you will choose and the format for the essay portion on the Unit #6 Exam. The essay will be evaluated on the usual 30 point scale.

Format: The actual essay will be written by hand or word-processed. You should prepare for a five-paragraph essay. That means that you should include an introduction (with a clear thesis statement), three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. (Note that the questions lend themselves to such a format. That is on purpose.)  

Remember that the questions are not designed for you to tell us everything you have learned. Focus on what the question is requiring you to do. 

I want them printed out (double spaced, please.) Printing double-sided is fine.

1. The Industrial Revolution was a time of great change. Identify and explain the significance of the THREE most important ways in which the Industrial Revolution impacted the world. Overall, was the Industrial Revolution a positive or negative stage in the history of the world? Why?

2. The Age of Imperialism had strong impacts on many areas of the world. Choose ONE of these areas and identify and explain the significance of the THREE most important ways in which imperialism impacted that area. Overall, was the Age of Imperialism a positive or negative stage in the history of the world? Why?

NOTE: For question #2, I would recommend choosing from one of these areas:
  • Africa
  • Middle East
  • India
  • East Asia and the Pacific
In your body paragraphs, do not mix and match from various areas. In that concluding paragraph, you are free to make references to imperialism on a more "global" level.

Lesson #35 - Japan Modernizes

This lesson will be used in 4th hour on Tuesday, October 18th.
This lesson will be used in 2nd hour on Wednesday, October 19th.

We'll wrap up this week with a look at Japan's modernization of the 19th century. I've found some new resources that are very visual and pretty interesting. 

The "Red-Haired Barbarians" - Japanese woodblock prints
As you might remember, Japan was largely isolated (by choice) from the industrializing world. The Dutch were the only Europeans allowed access to Japan for trade, and that was restricted to the port of Nagasaki. Here's a collection of 40 Japanese woodblock prints depicting Dutch traders and the perceptions of the Japanese of foreigners.

Do this:  Take a few minutes and browse the collection, looking for interesting images. Following that, we can talk about what you've seen.

The West Arrives - Commodore Perry 
In 1853, a US naval fleet entered Japan's main harbor with a letter from US President Millard Fillmore for the Japanese emperor.


Do this: Read the President's letter. Put yourself in the position of Japan's emperor and/or the shogun and briefly outline your response. We'll talk about that a bit. After that, take a look at the Treaty of Kanagawa to see what was decided.

Browse around this very cool site from MIT's "Visualizing Cultures" project: Black Ships and Samurai. Be sure you look at the "Visual Narratives" and watch the "Black Ship Scroll" unfold.

The Meiji Restoration
In 1868, the Tokugawa Shogunate ended when Emperor Mutsuhito began his 45-year reign known as the Meiji era, or the Meiji Restoration.


Do this: Read through the Charter Oath of the Meiji. What role do citizens play in this new vision of government? Does this strike you as democratic?  Why or why not?

Now, skim through the Meiji Constitution of 1889. How well were the promises of the oath fulfilled? To what degree are these documents influenced by the Enlightenment? Are they democratic?  Why or why not?


MIT's "Visualizing Cultures" 
I'd never seen this site before the night before the first time I taught World 10 on this topic, and I have to say that it is pretty cool. It aims to "wed images and scholarly commentary in innovative ways to illuminate social and cultural history." By coincidence, their first ever unit focuses on the time period in Japanese history that we are studying. This is the kind of resource that makes the laptop program worthwhile.

Do this: You'll work with a couple others to look more closely at one of the following "units" and give us a short recap of what you found most interesting. Definitely do the "visual narratives" section.


Homework for next session - Monday, October 24th:     

Continue your reading in Chapter 28 with Section 3, "U.S. Economic Imperialism." (pp. 816 - 821) The quiz format will be fill-in-the-blank.

Your Industrialization and Imperialism cartoons are due on Monday.

Your Blog-a-Thon entry should be posted by the end of this school week.

Your China: Learning by Doing assignments are due by the end of next Tuesday.



Lesson #34 - China and the World

4th hour will use this lesson on Monday, October 17th.
2nd hour will use this lesson on Tuesday, October 18th.

Our focus for these next two days will be on the way in which China and Japan emerge, or are forced to emerge, from periods of relative isolation. Today it will be China, and tomorrow's focus will be on Japan. We'll do two more lessons on America's economic imperialism and the Mexican Revolution next week. That's it for our first quarter. I'll have Unit #6 Exam information available tomorrow.

China and the World - Introduction
We'll spend a few minutes together here at the top to make sure you have at least a basic understanding of some of the key events from China's history in the 19th century. Remember that they had largely chosen a path of isolation once the Age of European Exploration began.

At a minimum, you should be familiar with:

  • Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1911)
  • Opium War (1839)
    • Treaty of Nanjing (1842)
    • Hong Kong
    • extraterritorial rights
  • Taiping Rebellion (1850 - 1864)
    • Hong Xioquan
  • Open Door Policy
  • Boxer Rebellion (1900)
    • Dowager Empress Cixi

19th Century China - Learning by Doing
Here's your chance to decide which way you want to go about learning some more about events from 19th century China. You have three choices that are described below. Because I believe they have varying degrees of difficulty and complexity, I am making them worth different numbers of points.

It works like this. The assignment is worth 10 points. Here are the values for the different options.

  • China Crossword - 8 points for solid work that meets all expectations. You CAN receive up to 10 points for work that goes beyond the basic expectations. That is done at my discretion.
  • Opium War: Primary Sources - 9 points for solid work that meets all expectations. You CAN receive up to 11 points for work that goes beyond the basic expectations. That is done at my discretion.
  • Make-your-own-China-DBQ - 10 points for solid work that meets all expectations. You CAN receive up to 12 points for work that goes beyond the basic expectations. That is done at my discretion.
In all of these cases, you can work in a group of up to 3 people if you would like. I need all of these assignments turned in by the end of next Tuesday (10/25) to get full credit. Since I won't necessarily know who is working with whom, I need all names of group members to be on the completed assignment.

Here are the particulars for the given assignments:

China - Crossword:
Use any of the readily available crossword puzzle makers from the Internet. (Note: You do this at your own risk. I make no allowances for complaints like, "The website didn't work," or "We couldn't figure out how to print it.")

You need at least 15 clues and answers drawing from the material in Chapter 28, Section 1 and related topics. I should get both a "blank" puzzle with clues and a completed copy of the clues from you.

Opium War: Primary Sources:
This is just what it sounds like. You'll get a copy of documents from both the British and the Chinese related to the Opium War. You are responsible for submitting answers to the six "Questions" (pp. 290 - 291), as well as to at least one of the "For Further Discussion" questions (p. 291).

Make Your Own DBQ:
This is your chance to create your own document based question on sources related to 19th century China. You can do either a general look at the period or a more specific focus on a particular period or event or person.

Here are the required elements:
  • There needs to be a "question." (It's the "big picture" under which the documents all fit, or it is the essay topic from the ones we've looked at in class.)
  • There should be a paragraph of relevant historical background information.
  • You need to provide excerpts from at least five relevant documents. Documents can include quotations, excerpts, maps, photographs, letters, laws and perhaps more. (Each should have a question to be answered, as do the ones we've used in class.)
  • All documents must be identified by author, title and date as necessary.
  • The DBQ should be reasonably free of spelling and grammar errors.
You're free to use any appropriate sources, but here are two suggested places to do some looking...

  • China's Disaster: 1840 - 1949 - a portion of Paul Halsall's vast collection of on-line primary sources
  • Asia for Educators - This site from Columbia University has a lot of information in various places around the site. (Check China - 1750 to 1914 as a start.)


Homework for next session - That is Tuesday, October 18th for 4th hour and Wednesday, October 19th for 2nd hour.

Continue your reading in Chapter 28 with Section 2, "Modernization in Japan." (pp. 810 - 813) The quiz format will be back to multiple choice.

Remember that your Imperialism and Industrialization Cartoons are finally due next Monday.

You should also post your "Blog-a-thon" comment on Blog #33 before the end of this school week.

Your China: Learning by Doing assignments are due by the end of next Tuesday.

Lesson #33 - Imperialism in Southeast Asia

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Our look at imperialism will continue today with an examination of some events in Southeast Asia, including the United States' efforts in the Pacific.

The Colonial Ledger: You were asked to brainstorm a list of effects of colonialism. Let's talk about what you came up with, and I can share some others from a source I've used before with this activity.

Crucible of Empire - The Spanish-American War: This is another great PBS site that chronicles the beginning of the United States' dealing with their own supporters and opponents of imperialism. There are a number of things here that might interest you. Check out some of these:

1895 - Cuban War for Independence
August 1896 - Revolt in the Philippines
February 16, 1898 - Battleship U.S.S. Maine Explodes
April 25, 1898 - Congress Declares War
May 1, 1898 - Commodore Dewey's Victory in the Philippines
March 23, 1901 - Aguinaldo captured by U.S. troops

America in the Philippines: After acquiring the Philippines from Spain as a result of the war, The United States needed to consider the issue of imperialism. Led by President McKinley's call to "educate Filipinos, and uplift and Christianize them," the Americans stayed in the islands. Fierce resistance broke out among Filipino rebels, and a brutal three-year war followed. While over 4000 American soldiers died from fighting and disease, it is estimated that somewhere between 250,000 and 500,000 Filipinos died as a result of the fighting.

The Philippine History Site has a number of good resources on The Philippine-American War.

  • American Designs and the Benevolent Assimilation tells of the plans to bring the Philippines under American control while also containing some interesting information about how US textbooks do/don't cover this issue.

  • You don't have to read much of the American Campaign of Brutality to understand the parallels many have drawn to a conflict the United States found itself involved in much later, the Vietnam War.

The White Man's Burden In 1899, Rudyard Kipling wrote this poem to mark the annexation of the Philippines. Read through the entire poem and see what you think of it, particularly in terms of Kipling's view of imperialism. We'll talk about this one a bit. Here's a parody of the poem written a few years later.

"Kipling, the 'White Man's Burden,' and US Imperialism" (Monthly Review, November 2003) is a challenging, but very interesting article that looks at Kipling's poem in light of recent events in American history and foreign policy. It's really thought-provoking.


Blog-a-thon:
We're going to end today by giving you some choices. Basically, you're responsible for posting a blog comment on one of the topics by 8:30 on Wednesday morning. Post it to THIS blog entry.

Choose and post a good blog comment on one of these:

  • Read the article, "American imperialism? No need to run away from the label." (USATODAY.com, 5/5/2003) Comment on the article and the main issues it raises in your mind.

  • Read the essay, "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell. (He's probably best known as the author of 1984 and Animal Farm.) This essay draws on some of the ideas we've been talking about these last few days. Comment on the essay and how you think it is/is not relevant to the Age of Imperialism.

  • "Yellow Journalism" played a role in the imperial debate in the United States and elsewhere. Put yourself in the role of a "yellow journalist" and choose one of these scenarios from which to write a brief "story" for your readers.
- British journalist in India during Sepoy Mutiny of 1857
- British journalist in South Africa during the Boer War
- American observer in the Philippines in 1900
- American journalist in Hawaii in 1893


HOMEWORK for next session - Monday, October 17th for 4th hour and Tuesday, October 18th for 2nd hour
 
Please begin your reading in the final chapter of the quarter. Read Chapter 28, Section 1, "China Resists Outside Influence." (pp. 805 - 809)

Your "Blog-a-thon" entry is due by the start of school on Wednesday, October 19th.

Your cartoons on Industrialization and Imperialism are due on Monday, October 24th.


Lesson #32 - British Rule in India

Here's a link to the Extra Credit option for World History 10 this quarter. (These need to be posted by the end of the day on Sunday, October 30th in order to get credit.) Note that the "page" explaining this assignment is found over on the right of the blog.

Let's wait until tomorrow to check in on your "colonial ledgers." Instead, we'll head over to India to look at the age of British rule and its effects, largely through a debate format.

British Imperialism in India - Brief Timeline

1707 - Mughal Empire is collapsing
1757 - East India Company troops win at Battle of Plassey
1857 - Sepoy Mutiny takes place
1858 - Raj begins as British take direct control of India
1877 - British viceroy rules India
1885 - Indian National Congress Forms
1905 - Partition of Bengal into Hindu and Muslim sections
1947 - India gains independence


The Sepoy Mutiny: Here's a website from Emory University that takes a look at the events of the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857. To better understand what this was all about, you might want to browse some of the following sections:

  • Introduction
  • Religion
  • Divide and Conquer
  • Expansionism
  • Torture and Oppression
  • The Rebellion
  • The Cawnpore Massacres
  • The Siege of Delhi
  • Conclusion

Debate
: You'll be asked to represent one of the two sides in a brief debate on the resolution below. I'll provide you with an additional set of information for "your" side that should be helpful, and you will have some time to look at the resources below.

** On balance, the era of British rule was beneficial for India. **

Download a copy of the Imperialism in India flowsheet to help keep track of arguments. Keep in mind there is a distinction between facts, interpretations made about facts, and judgments made on the basis of an interpretation. All have a place in a discussion or debate, but be aware of the way in which they differ.

An example might be:
Fact: "We take daily reading quizzes in World History 10."
Interpretation: "Mr. Vergin thinks it is important that we read and understand the material."
Judgment: "Mr. Vergin is mean because I'd rather be playing in the yard than doing the reading."

We'll hold this informal, large-group debate during the last thirty minutes of class.

DBQ Activity - Imperialism in India: An Evaluation Spending a little time with both these document excerpts and the primary sources below will help you with our culminating activity, a brief debate on the impact of British rule on India.

Primary Sources on India: Here are a number of primary sources related to the British rule in India. Some might be particularly useful for our conversation, and others are simply provided for your information.


HOMEWORK for next session - That's Friday, October 14th for 4th hour and Monday, October 17th for 2nd hour
 
Please finish your reading in Chapter 27 with Section 5, "Imperialism in Southeast Asia." (pp. 796 - 799) The quiz will be true/false.

The "Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism" assignments are due Monday, October 24th.

Lesson #31 - The Colonial Era in Africa

SECOND HOUR WILL USE THIS LESSON ON THURSDAY.

We introduced the topic of imperialism last session, largely through our look at the Scramble for Africa. Today, we'll continue along this general theme, taking more of a look at the colonial era that followed. Tomorrow, we'll turn our attention to India.

Let's make sure we have the basic language of imperialism down. There are four major forms of imperialism:
  • colony
  • protectorate
  • sphere of influence
  • economic imperialism
Make sure you've got a solid understanding of the two basic "styles" on imperial rule:
  • indirect control
  • direct control
Here are a couple of interesting graphs from the Statistics on the Extent of European Colonialism.

Let's spend about ten minutes with a DBQ activity that provides a solid overview of imperialism in Africa.

The Congo - Then and Now: We mentioned last week that the Congo has had a turbulent history from King Leopold II to the present. Here's an article from a couple years back updating the situation for you. Basically, estimates are that as many as 5.4 million people have died due to "Africa's First World War" over the past decade. Congo's Death Rate Unchanged Since War Ended - The New York Times, January 23, 2008. If you want a more in-depth understanding of this very complicated event, check out Chaos in Congo: A Primer from The New York Times in 2000.

The Colonial Era: We touched upon a number of these issues yesterday, so I'll share with you a set of my old notes on the Colonial Era in Africa that might be useful in the activities that follow. In particular, let's look at the various ways in which people responded to colonialism.

The Colonial Ledger: This is simple. Click on the title to download a simple chart. A "ledger" is a book used in accounting and elsewhere to keep track of transactions. Here, you are asked work with two or three others to brainstorm a list of effects of colonialism. Some may be positive, while many are certainly negative. Try also to classify them as economic, political and social. You should have a total of at least 12 impacts, with some in each of the six categories.

Primary Sources on Imperialism: Here are a number of primary sources related to imperialism. Some are ones we will work with, and others are simply provided for your information.

Colonialism in 10 Minutes - Scramble for Africa - This is a YouTube clip from a recently released documentary film, Uganda Rising. I think it does a good job of giving you a quick overview of the Scramble for Africa, while it also links the past to the present in the country of Uganda very effectively.


HOMEWORK for next session - Thursday, October 13th (for 4th hour) and Friday, October 14th (for 2nd hour)
 
Please continue your reading in Chapter 27 with Section 4, "British Imperialism in India." (pp. 791 - 795)

Remember that the "Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism" assignments are due on Monday, October 24th. You can find the directions for that back on Lesson #24.

Lesson #30 - Imperialism and the "Scramble for Africa"

Here's the Quarter 1 World History Extra Credit Film Options if you are interested. Let me know if you have other films that you think should be added.

We'll begin our look at the "Age of Imperialism" today. After a quick introduction, we'll hold a quick simulation of the Berlin Conference. Next session, we'll look at bit more at the theoretical basis for imperialism and the various responses to European colonialism.

Before we get too far, let's make sure that we've got an understanding of the term "imperialism," as well as the various factors that motivated Europe to pursue a strategy of imperialism in Europe.

The Berlin Conference: Assume we are meeting in 1885, even though some of your "characters" may already have made their impact by then. Each of you will represent a particular person or interest. Whatever perspective you are asked to represent, be sure you understand basic answers to these questions before we are finished:

  • What was the "Scramble for Africa?"
  • What factors led to the Scramble both during and after the Berlin Conference?
  • What are some examples of the Europeans "carving the magnificent African cake?"

After you receive your "person" or group, consider their perspective on the Scramble. If you are a specific, historical figure (marked by *), be sure to read the correct link on the "Individuals" section of the "Scramble for Africa" web page produced by Chico High School in California. (If you are not a particular person, you may still find useful information there.) Otherwise, consult our reading and the information from the BBC's The Story of Africa page on "Europe and Africa."

Download a copy of the matrix for
The Scramble for Africa so that you have a place to jot down some notes regarding the motivations and actions of these people, both real and fictional.


The Colonial Ledger: This is simple. Click on the title to download a simple chart. A "ledger" is a book used in accounting and elsewhere to keep track of transactions. Here, you are asked to brainstorm a list of effects of colonialism. Some may be positive, while many are certainly negative. Try also to classify them as economic, political and social. You should have a total of at least 8 impacts, with some in each of the six categories for tomorrow.


HOMEWORK for next session - Thursday, October 13th for 2nd Hour and Wednesday, October 14th for 4th Hour
 
Please continue your reading in Chapter 27 with Section 3, "Europeans Claim Muslim Lands." (pp. 786 - 790)
 
Have the required number of entries made on your "Colonial Ledger" for discussion next session.

Just a reminder that the "Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism" assignments are due Monday, October 24th. You can find the directions for that back on Lesson #24.

Lesson #29 - 1889 Paris World Exposition

NOTE: 2nd hour won't have class on Wednesday. (4th will.) The opposite happens NEXT Wednesday, which is Grandparents and Special Friends Day. I'll keep doing the single blog entry, but 2nd hour will be a day behind for a week beginning on Wednesday...

1889 Paris World Exposition - Your job is to pretend that we are all at the 1889 Paris World Exposition. We're focusing on the material from Chapter 26, Section 4, "Nineteenth-Century Progress." (Don't forget that we are playing fast and loose with time, as some of these developments came AFTER 1889...)

If you are interested, here's where where today's visitors rank in The 100:  A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History." Remember, this is the opinion of the author, Michael H. Hart, but it still makes for interesting browsing.

Here are the people and ideas/inventions about which we will learn:

  • Thomas Edison - phonograph and light bulb (others?)
  • Alexander Graham Bell - telephone
  • Guglielmo Marconi - radio
  • Henry Ford - automobile
  • Wright Brothers - human flight
  • Louis Pasteur - germ theory of disease
  • Joseph Lister - antiseptics
  • Charles Darwin - evolution
  • Gregor Mendel - genetics
  • Dmitri Mendeleev - periodic table of the elements
  • Marie and Pierre Curie - radioactivity
  • Sigmund Freud - psychology
  • Herbert Spencer - Social Darwinism
Here's information on the "real" 1889 World's Fair if you are curious.

If we should happen to finish early, we can pick your brains a bit about the recent news. Otherwise, we'll be starting our look at imperialism tomorrow.


HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Tuesday, October 11th

Your WWED? comments should be posted to Blog Entry - Lesson #27 by the end of today.

Please continue your reading in Chapter 27 with Section 2, "Imperialism - Case Study: Nigeria." (pp. 779 - 784)

Just a reminder that your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, October 24th. You can find the directions for that back on Lesson #24.

Lesson #28 - A Day Without a Theme

We're sort of in that space between the Industrial Revolution and Age of Imperialism that really lacks a name or defining idea. So, we'll touch briefly on a few things before shifting our attention to imperialism next week.

Your blog postings for the WWED assignment on Lesson #27 are due on THAT lesson before Monday's class time.

So, here's our list of things to accomplish today, despite the lack of any unifying theme...

First up, we can take a minute to chat about any of the economics information that needs clarification.

Second, we're getting to the point where some of what we do will be closely linked to topics that you will also see next year in Modern U.S. History. For example, Chapter 26:1 deals with the expansion of suffrage to more groups of men and to women as well. You'll take a close look at the women's suffrage movement in America next year, so we'll largely leave it alone. (If you know that the 19th century saw the expansion of male suffrage while women in the US and Great Britain didn't gain the right to vote until after World War I, you are in good shape for this class.)

If you want a bit of a preview, take a look at the Declaration of Sentiments drafted at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention.  Look familiar?

Third, we're starting to see the roots of many of the events that will persist well into the 20th century and today. For example, Chapter 26:1 also mentioned several events important in the history of Judaism. You should be familiar with two terms and one event:

  • Anti-Semitism refers to a prejudice against, and/or hatred of, the Jewish people. (Here's what the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has to say on the topic.)
  • Zionism can be thought of as a sort of Jewish nationalism, in which the goal was to re-establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine. It found a leader in the 1890s in Theodore Herzl.
  • The Dreyfus Affair was an early example of the tension between these two ideas, this time in France in 1894. The trial and imprisonment of Jewish army Captain Alfred Dreyfus was based on false evidence, and it divided the French population. Anti-Semitism certainly played a role in these events, and it was only later that Dreyfus was freed and pardoned.

Fourth, we'll take a quick look at the themes of expansion and "manifest destiny" as covered in Chapter 26:3. I've got an interesting set of three documents related to the Mexican-American War fought between 1846 and 1848. You'll see what both supporters and opponents of the war thought, as well as what Mexican textbooks have to say about the issue.

Fifth, note that we're not doing anything specific with the Civil War. I'm assuming that you've studied that at some point. (Don't forget that the Union (the North) won...) If you've never taken a look at them before, both the Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation are worth a look...

Finally, the remaining time is yours to work on your 1889 Paris World Exposition presentations. They'll take place on Monday.


HOMEWORK for next session - Monday, October 10th

TWO readings are due for Monday. (This is the only time we'll do this for the unit.) We'll give you the Chapter 26, Section 4, "Nineteenth-Century Progress" (pp. 762 - 767) quiz to take home and complete. The Chapter 27, Section 1, "The Scramble for Africa" (pp. 773 - 778) quiz will be taken in class as usual on Monday.

Your WWED blog posting should be made on Lesson #27 by Monday's class time. You can find the instructions on yesterday's blog entry.

We will be holding our 1889 Paris World Exposition (or "Fair" if you prefer) on Monday, October 10th. You'll each have a short presentation ready for that.

Your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, October 24th. Instructions for that are found back on Lesson #24.


Lesson #27 - Clashing Views on the Economy

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Hopefully some of the economic thinking we did yesterday will pay off for you somewhere along the line. We'll try to do a little more of that as the opportunities arise. Today, we'll look at the comparative economic systems a bit more closely.

Here's the information for the activity I meant to set up yesterday...  It takes place on Monday.

1889 Paris World Exposition - I probably shouldn't admit this, but the idea for this assignment came from The Magic Tree House book, The Night of the New Magicians. You're going to have to do a little time traveling with me for this one to work, but here's the premise.

We're all at the 1889 Paris World Exposition. You each have a person and topic on which to present. (Most of you will be working in pairs.) We'll be focusing on the material from Chapter 26, Section 4, "Nineteenth-Century Progress." Yes, I KNOW some of the things you'll be presenting on were not even invented yet in 1889. That's the whole time travel thing.

For each of the presentations, I'd like to see the following elements:
  • something visual (Powerpoint or video clip or whatever)
  • background on the development or invention
  • consideration of both the economic and social consequences of the idea/invention
  • mention of key developments/impacts since the original idea/invention
Here are the people and ideas/inventions from which you'll choose:
  • Thomas Edison - phonograph and light bulb (others?)
  • Alexander Graham Bell - telephone
  • Guglielmo Marconi - radio
  • Henry Ford - automobile
  • Wright Brothers - human flight
  • Louis Pasteur - germ theory of disease
  • Joseph Lister - antiseptics
  • Charles Darwin - evolution
  • Gregor Mendel - genetics
  • Dmitri Mendeleev - periodic table of the elements
  • Marie and Pierre Curie - radioactivity
  • Sigmund Freud - psychology
  • Herbert Spencer - Social Darwinism
We'll hold our version of the 1889 Paris World Exposition on Monday, October 11th. Here's information on the "real" 1889 World's Fair if you are curious.


Debating Economic Systems - If you have strong feelings about one of more of the economic systems we have discussed, here's your chance to share them. To make things more interesting, you're going to be ASSIGNED at random to a particular side. You'll receive a slip with a statement on it. You and the others with the same slips will have ten minutes of preparation time and then three minutes to present "your" side. After that, the rest of us can weigh in with our comments. Here are the six "sides" you might receive. (Page 737 is a good starting place for most of you.)

Before we hear each pair of arguments, we'll make sure we've got the basic ideas of each of these down.

Capitalism
Capitalism is the most effective economic system.
Capitalism is a flawed economic system.

Socialism
Socialism is the most effective economic system.
Socialism is a flawed economic system

Marxism (Communism)
Marxism is the ideal economic system.
Marxism is a flawed economic system.


WWED? - "What Would the Economist Do?"
Here's where history meets current events.

You're going to select one of these economists:
  • Adam Smith
  • David Ricardo
  • Thomas Malthus
  • Charles Fourier
  • Karl Marx
Now, bring that person to the present. You're going to have "them" write a blog comment that you will post to this lesson. All comments should be posted before the start of class time on Monday. Have your economist comment upon/ analyze/ make recommendations for one of the current economic issues facing either the United States or the world. Obviously, what you write should be consistent with what your economist might say about the issue were they alive today.

Figure a minimum of one good paragraph. Be sure it is clear both which economist you are writing as and what the issue is that they are writing about. (Of course, be sure I also know who is really posting the blog comment so that you can get credit.)

By the way, I debated whether or not to use the WWED phrasing since WWJD ("What would Jesus do?") was originally a term used by some Christian groups. My thought is that it has become enough of a pop culture expression ("What would ____ do?") that there is no offense here. Doing a little research (cough, Wikipedia), I discovered there's a term for that: snowclone. That's a cliche that "can be used in an entirely open array of different variants by lazy ... writers." Hey, that's me.


HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Friday, October 8th

Much of the information should look pretty familiar to you, but continue your reading in Chapter 26, Section 3, "War and Expansion in the United States." (pp. 758 - 761) We're back to multiple choice in the quiz rotation.

Your WWED? blog comment is due to be posted before the start of class Monday.

We will be holding our 1889 Paris World Exposition (or "Fair" if you prefer) on Monday, October 10th. You'll each have a short presentation ready for that.

Your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, October 24th. Instructions for that are found back on Lesson #24.

Lesson #26 - "Economics for Sophomores"

We're at a key time in the world's history in terms of the field of economics. You've been introduced to Smith and Marx, as well as a number of terms used in the field. I think that both the rest of this year and all of next year's United States history will make more sense if we spend some time looking at these people and ideas. We'll do that today.


"Economics for Sophomores" - I'm teaching Economics fourth quarter to some seniors, but we'll try and give you a quick overview today. Think of this more as a "workshop" than a lecture. I'll get you trying some graphing, etc.

Download a copy of this Economics for Sophomores note guide and have a piece of paper and writing instrument ready...


1889 Paris World Exposition - I probably shouldn't admit this, but the idea for this assignment came from The Magic Tree House book, The Night of the New Magicians. You're going to have to do a little time traveling with me for this one to work, but here's the premise.

We're all at the 1889 Paris World Exposition. You each have a person and topic on which to present. (Most of you will be working in pairs.) We'll be focusing on the material from Chapter 26, Section 4, "Nineteenth-Century Progress." Yes, I KNOW some of the things you'll be presenting on were not even invented yet in 1889.  That's the whole time travel thing.

For each of the presentations, I'd like to see the following elements as appropriate:
  • something visual (Powerpoint or video clip or whatever)
  • background on the development or invention
  • consideration of both the economic and social consequences of the idea/invention
  • mention of key developments/impacts since the original idea/invention
Here are the people and ideas/inventions from which you'll choose:
  • Thomas Edison - phonograph and light bulb (others?)
  • Alexander Graham Bell - telephone
  • Guglielmo Marconi - radio
  • Henry Ford - automobile
  • Wright Brothers - human flight
  • Louis Pasteur - germ theory of disease
  • Joseph Lister - antiseptics
  • Charles Darwin - evolution
  • Gregor Mendel - genetics
  • Dmitri Mendeleev - periodic table of the elements
  • Marie and Pierre Curie - radioactivity
  • Sigmund Freud - psychology
  • Herbert Spencer - Social Darwinism
We'll hold our version of the 1889 Paris World Exposition on Monday, October 10th. Here's information on the "real" 1889 World's Fair if you are curious.


HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Thursday, October 6th

Continue your reading in Chapter 26, Section 2, "Self-Rule for British Colonies." (pp. 751 - 755) The quiz will be matching.

Just a reminder that your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, October 24th.

We will be holding our 1889 Paris World Exposition (or "Fair" if you prefer) on Monday, October 10th. You'll each have a short presentation ready for that.

Lesson #25 - The Industrial Revolution - Roundtable Discussion

I'll have a handout for you with both our "roster" of characters and the specific questions with which we'll begin our discussion. We'll plan on at least fifteen minutes for each of the three "sections" of our overall conversation. We'll take time for introductions at the start of each of the three panels.

The Industrial Revolution: Beginnings
Jethro Tull
Robert Bakewell - Not this class
John Kay
Eli Whitney
James Watt
Robert Fulton
John McAdam
Richard Trevithick

Questions for this first panel:
  • What do you think was the most important cause of the Industrial Revolution?
  • Why England?
  • Was industrialization inevitable? If so, why don't we see it outside Europe at this time?
  • Was increased population a cause or an effect of the Industrial Revolution? Explain.
  • Would the world have been better off without the shift from an agrarian to an industrial outlook in much of the world?
  • Which development was the most crucial to the Industrial Revolution?
  • Which of the inventions of the Industrial Revolution most affects us today?

The Industrial Revolution:  Effects
Elizabeth Gaskell
William Cooper
Ned Ludd
Michael Thomas Sadler
victim of cholera outbreak - Not this class
Birmingham coal miner - Not this class
Francis Cabot Lowell
Lucy Larcom

Questions for this second panel:
  • Industrialization: Was it worth it? Why or why not?
  • Was the effect of the Industrial Revolution the same on men and women?
  • Which affected life the most: the French Revolution or the Industrial Revolution?
  • How much of the suffering and difficulties of the Industrial Revolution could have been easily prevented?
  • Was greed the primary cause of the revolution's negative impacts?
  • What, if anything, could reasonably have been done to improve the lives of workers and citizens during the time of the Industrial Revolution?
  • How did the Industrial Revolution change society?

The Industrial Revolution: Responses
Adam Smith
David Ricardo
Thomas Malthus
John Stuart Mill - Not this class
Robert Owen
Charles Fourier
Karl Marx
Friedrich Engels

Questions for this third panel:
  • To what extent was "your" work a reaction to the Industrial Revolution?
  • In your mind, was the Industrial Revolution positive or negative? Why?
  • How could the negative effects of industrialization been minimized?
  • What should be the relationship between the workers and the factory owners?
  • Are their ethical and/or human rights issues at stake here in the Industrial Revolution?
  • How and when should government intervene in the affairs of business?
  • Did the Industrial Revolution cause an increase in global inequality? Why or why not?
  • What are the most lasting impacts of the Industrial Revolution
  • Are we undergoing technological changes that will later be seen as a "revolution?"

HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Wednesday, October 5th 


Please start your reading in Chapter 26 with Section 1, "Reforming the Industrial World." (pp. 747 - 750) The quiz will be true/false.

No hurry to get started, but your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignment is due on Monday, October 24th. Directions are on yesterday's blog.

Lesson #24 - Migration: People on the Move

We'll be setting up another activity today, and we'll also be taking a slight detour from our look at the Industrial Revolution and its aftermath. We'll be back to that as our main topic for tomorrow.

As a warmup, let's do this one that we didn't get to on Friday...

Charts and graphs and other things, Oh my! (That's a version of the "Lions, and tigers, and bears! Oh, my!" exchange from The Wizard of Oz... Just thought you might want to know.) I've got five sheets containing various styles and sorts of information. You'll get one of them, and we'll share what we've got...

Industrial Revolution - Discussion
Tomorrow, we'll host a discussion on a variety of topics related to the Industrial Revolution. Basically, your "character" will be most involved in one of the three phases of the discussion, and those phases will mirror the three DBQs: beginnings, effects and responses.

The Industrial Revolution: Beginnings
Jethro Tull (p. 717)
Robert Bakewell (p. 718)
John Kay (p. 718-719)
Eli Whitney (p. 720)
James Watt (p. 721)
Robert Fulton (p. 720)
John McAdam (p. 721)
Richard Trevithick (p. 721)

At the beginning, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself. We want to know who you are and how you contributed to the Industrial Revolution. (Figure around 1 minute or so.)

The Industrial Revolution: Effects
Elizabeth Caskell (p. 724)
William Cooper (p. 724/DBQ)
Ned Ludd (p. 726)
Michael Thomas Sadler (DBQ)
victim of cholera outbreak (p. 724)
Birmingham coal miner (p. 725)
Francis Cabot Lowell (p. 729)
Lucy Larcom (p. 730)

At the beginning, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself. We want to know how you were affected by the Industrial Revolution, as well as what you believe should be done.

The Industrial Revolution:  Responses
Adam Smith (p. 724)
David Ricardo (p. 735)
Thomas Malthus (p. 735)
John Stuart Mill (p. 735)
Robert Owen (p. 736)
Charles Fourier (p. 736)
Karl Marx (p. 736)
Friedrich Engels (p. 736)

At the beginning, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself. We want to understand your basic position, as well as what, if anything, you believe should be done in response to the Industrial Revolution and its effects.

You'll be provided with specific topics and questions for the rest of the discussion tomorrow.

Cartoons - Industrialization and Imperialism
In this assignment, you will produce two cartoons of your own in editorial/political cartoon style. One will be on industrialization (or a closely related issue) and one will be on imperialism (or a specific example). These will both be due on Monday, October 24th.

Here are the guidelines:
  • My preference is for each cartoon to be in black/color ink on 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper.
  • You may use multiple panels, but most cartoons of this style are usually a single panel.
  • Text on the cartoon may be typed (cut and paste) or hand-written, but must be legible.
  • Your ideas are more important than artistic excellence, but there should be evidence of appropriate effort.
  • You will be evaluated on adherence to topic, effectiveness of "message", creativity and execution.
If you want some additional samples, you might check these sites out:

Migration - 19th Century People on the Move
We'll do a couple of quick activities here on the movements of people around the world in the 19th century.

Remember that you may have identified "push" and "pull" factors that affected migration patterns last year. We'll use that idea again today. In addition, we'll take a look at the different types of migration.

  • internal
  • external
  • chain
  • temporary
You can work on getting ready for tomorrow's discussion with any remaining time...


HOMEWORK for tomorrow - Tuesday, October 4th 

Please finish up your reading in Chapter 25 with Section 4, "Reforming the Industrial World." (pp. 734 - 740) It's a longer section, and the quiz will be fill-in-the-blank.

We will have our Industrial Revolution - Discussion tomorrow. Remember that you have an assigned role from which you will be speaking.

No hurry to get started, but your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignment is due on Monday, October 24th. Directions are above.



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